SUPPORTS DISCUSSIONS THAT HELP
YOUNG POSTGRADUATES DEVELOP
THEIR CRITICAL AND LATERAL THINKING SKILLS

SUPPORTS DISCUSSIONS THAT HELP
YOUNG POSTGRADUATES DEVELOP
THEIR CRITICAL AND LATERAL THINKING SKILLS

SUPPORTS DISCUSSIONS THAT HELP
YOUNG POSTGRADUATES DEVELOP
THEIR CRITICAL AND LATERAL THINKING SKILLS

Opinion Pieces – Emerging Scholars Imprint

Supporting parenting is integral to the optimal development and wellbeing of children

Ahmed Riaz Mohamed

Lecturer and clinical psychologist, Department of Psychology

This opinion piece discusses the vital role of Early Childhood Development (ECD) sector in South Africa in supporting parents from socioeconomically disadvantaged communities. It argues that it is incumbent on government to respond to the calls for relief funding for the ECD sector to promote its post-lockdown survival to ensure the continued support for parents and children that is necessary for optimal development.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in the above articles are those of the author, and does not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Pretoria.

Food, symbolism and gendered identities in Zimbabwean Politics: Mama Grace’s ice cream and the 2017 Zanu-Pf leadership change

Tinashe Mawere

Centre for Sexualities, Aids; Gender (CSA&G), University of Pretoria, South Africa

In this opinion piece, Tinashe Mawere seeks to provoke deeper inquiries into the centrality of food, food substances, food and the spectacular, and ways of and the sub-texts of serving and consuming food, as well as the ways of imagining food in Zimbabwean politics. This work focuses on the symbolic, cultural and political significance of the ice cream served by Mama Grace Mugabe, (Zimbabwe’s former First Lady) during rallies. The acceptances and rejections of the ice cream, and Mama’s love, care, visibility and naturalized role in the nation graphically reflected the emergent factions within Zanu-Pf and also helped to widen them. To this extent, food, and specifically, the ice cream, acted as an agent of change leading to the ‘new dispensation’ led by Emmerson Mnangagwa. In addition, the ice cream or food serving in general, sprung as an agent of gendered identities as well as their re/production.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in the above articles are those of the author, and does not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Pretoria.

The future should be a relational economy

Marlie Holtzhausen

The Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic has delivered behavioural changes across cultures and social profiles the world over. In this opinion piece, Marlie Holtzhausen argues that moral commitment to people and livelihoods might just be a meaningful and sustainable alternative to an elite-based economy. If we can change our economic behaviour, we can pave the way towards building economies based on moral foundations. Perhaps Covid-19 gives us the opportunity to consider how the new economy we can build could be a more generous, equal society; an economy less obsessed with profits at all costs and more concerned with the wellbeing of others.

This article was published in City Press on the 10th of May 2020.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in the above articles are those of the author, and does not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Pretoria.

How the emergence of COVID-19 has highlighted the deep inequality in South Africa

Anke Nel, University of Pretoria.

The emergence of COVID-19 in South Africa has magnified the inequalities that exist throughout the country. Although praised for its peaceful transition into a democracy, structural inequalities in South Africa have and still require change. This cemented what former President Thabo Mbeki referred to as a two nation state (Justice Malala 2020).

The announcement of the ‘state of disaster’ and the resulting 35-day lockdown in the country has seemingly reaffirmed the growing division between the country’s rich and poor. While the privileged flocked to supermarkets and bottle stores – stocking up on everything from toilet paper to cartons of cigarettes and bottles of wine – the poor questioned what the lockdown would mean for their livelihoods. Those who managed to get to the stores, once they were paid, were quickly judged by the wealthy – who already sat at home with their pantries stocked, leaving a national television anchor to remind them to ‘check themselves, check their wallets and lastly, to check their privilege’ (Kabelo Chabalala).

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in the above articles are those of the author, and does not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Pretoria.

Movie Review: Moffie (2020), Director: Oliver Hermanus

Dr Stephen Symons
Postdoctoral Researcher, Dept. of Historical and Heritage Studies, University of Pretoria.

The power of Moffie is that it ultimately gives voice and draws attention to the oft-hidden and largely silenced history of a particular generation of white South African males, irrespective of their sexuality. Much like apartheid, the militarised childhoods of white males and their subsequent conscription into the SADF is one among many painful and traumatic South African histories, and the full extent of its damage will never be quantified. Ultimately, Moffie lifts a sharp-edged cinematic mirror to South African audiences that reflects the deep and endemic pain of all South Africans.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in the above articles are those of the author, and does not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Pretoria.

Opinion Piece feedback for the author

The future of international cooperation in times of existentialist crises

Mr Jaimal Anand
MA Student in International Relations at the University of Pretoria

As the Covid-19 virus continues to spread globally, the news media and social media are flooded with the horrors the deadly pandemic has caused. We’ve seen mass graves in Europe, while China contained over 50 million people in a single province, India has put 1.3 billion people and South Africa 58 million under lockdown. With all the technology and predictive gadgets at our disposal, something as medieval as a virus, with symptoms resembling the common cold or seasonal influenza, has ravaged the world and forced humanity to its knees.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in the above articles are those of the author, and does not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Pretoria.

SUBMIT YOUR OPINION PIECE

Authors can submit an Opinion Piece to ESI here.
Please indicate this is a working paper by selecting “Opinion Piece” under the subject heading.

Author Details


Personal Details


Article Upload


(File Type: .doc , .docx & Max. File Size:6MB)

I agree copyright terms.

Contact CAST

Please send us an email if you have any queries about our programme.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt

Start typing and press Enter to search